Header

This upcoming issue 7(2) of the Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies (ASEAS) will feature a focus on political utopias and homeland imaginaries held by Indonesians at home and abroad. The latter include labor and marriage migrants, overseas students, political exiles, and refugees living outside of their home country. However, being in exile does not always require ultimate departure from the homeland. As people can retreat into an “inner exile”, this special issue also takes into account the imaginaries of those who are physically within the boundaries of Indonesia yet in one way or another voluntarily or involuntarily ‘exiled’ from the rest of society, such as political and religious activists or prisoners. While away from ‘home’, the ‘homeland’ shapes the post-migratory life significantly and therefore remains a special point of reference for people’s biographies.

Despite modern communication technologies and more affordable transportation options that both allow for regular real-time contact and ‘staying in touch’ with current developments in Indonesia, homeland imaginaries are shaped to large extends by other, often rather emotive, factors. Indonesian diasporic or exilic populations, like others in the same situation, often opt for cherishing past memories (or traumas) over taking into account current developments, thereby generating ‘distorted’ homeland views. This said, homeland imaginaries are by no means homogeneous or static; quite to the contrary, they develop over time and they may turn out to be rather fragmented, ambivalent, or outright ‘unrealistic’ as the ‘outside’ Indonesians see their homeland in different lights.

Internal and external exiles may delve into memories of their past and might dream of their return and of brighter futures for Indonesia more generally. Hence, their imaginaries become a multi-facetted canvas for projections of longings for a better tomorrow and of a golden yesteryear. Yet, Indonesians who face the everyday realities in the homeland might not necessarily share these interpretations of the past or the visions for Indonesia’s future.

For the special issue, we specifically encourage papers that highlight:

  • Gender and class dynamics of utopias
  • Transnational dimensions of separatist conflicts and political utopias
  • Labor migration and remittances
  • Overseas student activism and religious networking
  • Marriage migration and gender dynamics
  • Cultural representations and folkloristic production of Indonesian artists abroad
  • Material expression of homeland longing

Guest Editors

Antje Missbach 

Antje Missbach studied Southeast Asian Studies and Anthropology at the Humboldt-University in Berlin and obtained her PhD from the Australian National University in Canberra. Currently she is a McKenzie Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Melbourne.

Henri Myrttinen 


Henri Myrttinen has been working in and on Indonesia and Timor-Leste for the past decade and obtained his PhD from the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. He is currently active as a researcher with the Mauerpark Institute in Berlin.

Deadline for Submissions

  • 15 January 2014

Further Details

  • If you intend to submit a paper, please contact:  antjemissbach@googlemail.com and henrimyrttinen@gmail.com
  • We also accept contributions outside the focus; in this case please contact the ASEAS editorial team aseas@seas.at.
  • You can find all our Guidelines for Submissions and the link to our Editorial Platform (to submit you paper) here.
  • Find this Call for Papers 7(2) as a pdficon_small PDF here.

 

REMINDER - CfP on CONFLICT DYNAMICS & TRANSFORMATIONS

Please find below our second current Call for Papers.

The upcoming issue 7(1) of the Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies (ASEAS) will feature a focus on “Conflict Dynamics and Transformations in South-East Asia” and aims at bringing together researchers from various academic fields in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of this complex topic. In a broader perspective, the term “conflict” refers to the expression of opposing interests that shape complex societal negotiation processes. Although the mode of procedural conflict resolution through legitimate institutions is usually deemed most desirable, the post-colonial states of South-East Asia are still the arena of a significant number of intra-state conflicts that have been carried out violently, some for decades. On the other hand, during the last decade, South-East Asian governments have increasingly started to move from military conflict resolution approaches towards politically negotiated resolutions. To understand these dynamics and assess their implications for future developments in the region, ASEAS welcomes submissions on methodological and theoretical approaches to conflict studies as well as empirical research that illustrate recent trajectories of conflict dynamics and transformations in South-East Asia.

Submissions dealing with one or several of the following issues are of special interest to the board of editors:

  • Theoretical debates on conflict resolution

  • Methodological challenges for empirical research in conflict-affected areas

  • Methodological contributions to the field: methods to understand root causes of conflicts, the interests and intentions of actors, and the transformation of conflicts from arms to politics

  • Studies in decentralization politics, their impact on center-periphery relations, and their contribution to conflict resolution

  • (Comparative) analyses of autonomy regulations and their impact on conflict dynamics, transformations, and resolutions

  • Interethnic and interreligious conflicts

  • Resource and environmental conflicts

  • Gender relations in conflict-affected and post-conflict areas

  • Transnational dimensions of local conflicts

  • The role of the ASEAN and other international organizations in conflict resolution approaches and mechanisms

  • Truth and reconciliation processes and their institutionalization

  • Local institutions of conflict mediation, regulation, and resolution

Guest Editor

Gunnar Stange is research associate at the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology and the Cluster of Excellence ‘The Formation of Normative Orders’ at Goethe-University, Frankfurt/ Main, Germany. His research interests lie in local conflicts, identity politics and development processes in South-East Asia, especially in Indonesia. He has worked in different development projects in Indonesia and Mozambique and has taught at the universities of Passau, Vienna, and Frankfurt. His PhD research project deals with political transformation and identity politics in post-conflict Aceh, Indonesia.

Deadline for Submissions

  • 15 December 2013

Further Details

  • If you intend to submit a paper, please contact: aseas@seas.at
  • We also accept contributions outside the focus; in this case please contact the ASEAS editorial team aseas@seas.at.
  • You can find all our Guidelines for Submissions and the link to our Editorial Platform (to submit you paper) here.
  • Find this Call for Papers 7(1) as a pdficon_small PDF here